ALL OF US STRANGERS – “A meditative journey in grief, acceptance, and ultimately, heartbreak”

All-of-Us-Strangers

RATING

DIRECTOR

Directed by: Andrew Haigh

MAIN CAST

Andrew Scott as Adam
Carter John Grout as young Adam
Paul Mescal as Harry
Jamie Bell as Adam's father
Claire Foy as Adam's mother

SYNOPSIS

It is based on the 1987 novel Strangers by Taichi Yamada.

One night in his near-empty London tower block, screenwriter Adam has a chance encounter with mysterious neighbor Harry, puncturing the rhythm of his everyday life. As a relationship develops between them, Adam finds himself drawn back to his childhood home, where his parents appear to be living just as they were on the day they died 30 years ago.

REVIEW SUMMARY

Andrew Haigh’s All of Us Strangers is a meditative journey in grief, acceptance, and ultimately, heartbreak. The film, which combines romance and fantasy, is as raw of a cinematic experience as it gets. Now, if you are one for having lots of “action” in your movie going experience, this is not for you. All of Us Strangers really takes its time, almost floating its way along. And, as you might imagine, it’s also dialogue heavy. And, let me tell you, the dialogue is heavy. This in regard to the themes that are tackled. It’s a lot to take in at times, but it’s always done in tender ways. The film also delivers a gut punch ending that no doubt encourages repeat viewings. And while all of the actors shine, it’s Andrew Scott who impressively carries the aching narrative in nearly every single scene. Yes, All of Us Strangers is an impeccably acted feature. It’s also an experience that will equal parts comfort and destroy you emotionally. You’ve been warned.

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